Voicing Discursive Binaries: A Postcolonial Study of Gordimer’s Short Stories

Authors

  • Nazeen Zahra Lecture, Department of English, University of Gujrat, Gujrat, Punjab, Pakistan.
  • Qurratulain Najeeb Jamal Lecturer, Department of English, Government College Women University, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan.
  • Shamshad Rasool Lecture, Department of English, University of Gujrat, Gujrat, Punjab, Pakistan.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55737/qjss.933575446

Keywords:

Gordimer, South Africans, Social Inequality, Voicing Discursive Binaries

Abstract

Massive decolonization occurred in the 21st century. The natives and the diaspora attempted to portray the other side of the image structured by the colonial hegemonic discourse. Gordimer has written against apartheid and raised her voice to articulate the realistic picture of the marginalization faced by the suppressed South Africans in the form of racial and social inequality. She incorporates discourse to challenge the existing colonial discourse and the explicit binaries. This study attempts to investigate the challenges she has put against the existing discursive binaries in her short stories. The concepts of colonial discourse and counter-discourse given by Edward Said and Helen Tiffin serve as a framework to analyze the data collected from the selected text. The findings reveal that Gordimer has employed different techniques of narration and characterization to redress the negative image of the oppressed others in the colonial discourse through binaries. She employs various textual strategies to expose the stereotypical binaries through counter-discursive practices to dismantle the colonial assumptions from the perspective of the natives.

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Author Biography

  • Shamshad Rasool, Lecture, Department of English, University of Gujrat, Gujrat, Punjab, Pakistan.

References

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Published

2024-06-30

Issue

Section

Articles

How to Cite

Zahra, N., Jamal, Q. N., & Rasool, S. (2024). Voicing Discursive Binaries: A Postcolonial Study of Gordimer’s Short Stories. Qlantic Journal of Social Sciences, 5(2), 316-324. https://doi.org/10.55737/qjss.933575446

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